Mon, 20 September
  • 8:45 - 9:30

    Official openings

    dr Monika Sajkowska – President of Empowering Children Foundation
    NASK representative
    Klicksafe representative
    Jarosław Ponder - Head of the ITU Office for Europe
    Orange Foundation representative
  • 9:30 - 11:00

    Opening session

    Born with a smartphone in hand – the iGen generation Prof. Tomasz Grzyb
    Some orthopaedic doctors claim that angling your head down towards your smartphone puts weight of up to 27 kg on your cervical spine. Considering that currently children use these devices for over 5 hours a day, one can easily imagine the degree of degenerative spine conditions this may lead to. However, even more interesting processes may take place in the organ which puts so much weight on the spine, namely in children’s and teenagers’ brains. In this presentation we will look into the changes that may be spotted in the behaviour of young people “glued to the internet”. We will present both, negative and positive aspects related to different information environment that children currently live in. We will also try to show how to minimise the risk of long-term negative consequences of living while connected do the internet for 24 hours a day.
    Digital Resilience: Keeping young people safe in a fast changing online world dr Linda Papadopoulos
    Advancements in our technologies have opened up untold possibilities in the ways that our children learn, socialise and play. The whole world is ‘literally' at their fingertips. And while the benefits are clear it's also important as parents and educators to be aware of online risks and prepare young people for these making them mentally hardy and digitally resilient. In this talk we will address what digital resilience is and how to equip children and young people with the skills to be safe and make the most of the online world. We will address the impact of increased screen time on families due to the pandemic, exploring issues around safety, boundaries, relationships both on and off line and body image. Finally we will look at tools that parents and educators can use in supporting their children to become healthy, happy and resilient digital citizens.
    Internet as a hostile territory Wojciech Orliński
    Only 10 years ago the dominating approach towards internet portrayed it as a place for free discussion, providing full access to cultural and scientific goods, and promoting bottom-up civic participation. No one could imagine any censorship of the internet content back then. Nowadays the internet has lost its innocence in the public opinion’s eyes (although it actually never had it). The last significant group still treating the internet with the naive sort of optimism are children. How shall we talk to them about threats?
  • 11:00 - 11:15

    Break

  • 11:15 - 12:15

    Panel debate - New reality? What has COVID-19 pandemic changed in youth online relations?

    During the debate, we will try to look again at the effects that the pandemic has had on young people, especially in the context of their online functioning in the Polish and European context.
    Moderator: Szymon Wójcik, Panelists: Gareth Cort, Joanna Flis, Rodrigo Nejm, Dr Karol Jachymek, Dr Marzena Żylinska
  • 12:15 - 12:30

    Break

  • 12:30 - 13:30

    Questions of digital wellbeing after the pandemic

    Advantages of dragon hunt – searching for positive outcomes of computer games Agnieszka Mulak
    In Europe, over 70% of children aged 6–10 play computer games, and this percentage is even higher among teenagers. Usually, media pay attention to risks related to this phenomenon, however during pandemic, due to social isolation, meetings with peers were only possible in virtual reality. Computer games were often the only possibility of having fun together. Does interaction in games play the same role as other forms of contact? What advantages may gaming have and what types of games may have positive impact on youth? During the presentation we will try to answer these questions and to look closer at what consequences popularity of computer games among children and youth may have for schools.
    Ommh online - How to deal with digital stress and promote our wellbeing Stefanie Fächner
    Who hasn't experienced this: we wanted to put our smartphones away long ago, but we're still glued to our devices, scrolling through posts, clicking to see which series Netflix recommends via push message, and swiping away the latest news from the news app. The pull of the digital is getting stronger and stronger, and many of us are finding it increasingly difficult to control it. How do we achieve a digital balance? How do we manage to escape the addictive networks and how do we deal with content from the web that is not good for us? The goal of this presentation is to educate about the strategies of providers as well as the appeal of social media and to provide educational professionals with tools to increase the digital well-being of young people.
    How to assess the educational potential of touchscreen apps for preschoolers? Joanna Kołak PhD
    Digital media, including touchscreen apps for children, are increasingly used both in family and at school. The COVID-19 pandemic was the time when one could especially observe an increased media use among children. Thousands of apps for children are called by their authors “educational” and yet, as the research suggests, most of them lack educational value. This means that informed decisions about which apps are high quality can be challenging for parents and educators. Together with the research team that I am part of we have designed recently a simple tool for parents and educators which will help them assess if the apps for preschoolers have educational value. During my presentation I will briefly introduce our tool, including its assessment criteria and explaining what was our motivation in selecting them. I will draw attention to strengths of apps for children and to the qualities they lack from the developmental psychology perspective.
  • 13:30 - 14:30

    Lunch break

  • 14:30 - 15:30

    Digital aggression and cyberbullying – problem and responses

    Online aggression and cyberbullying – what do we know after 15 years of research? Prof. Jacek Pyżalski
    The most important findings from the research on online aggression and cyberbullying conducted within the last fifteen years are going to be presented in a synthetic manner. The special attention will be drawn to the findings in the field of prevention and intervention, as well as to the areas that have not been researched yet.
    The Role of Schools in Cyberbullying Prof. Anja Schultze-Krumbholz
    Cyberbullying has been shown to take place outside of school more often than inside school. School administrators therefore often argue that cyberbullying is not an issue for schools and school personnel. However, numerous studies have shown relationships of school variables with cyberbullying as well as an impact of cyberbullying on school-related variables. This presentation gives an overview of research results focusing on schools' role in cyberbullying and presents opportunities for action for teachers and other school staff.
    RESQL – Programme for peer violence prevention in primary and secondary schools Małgorzata Wójcik PhD
    The school peer violence prevention programme RESQL creates safe space for communication (applications for reporting incidents of violence); introduces reports management procedure (answering, categorising, intervening); increases teachers and students’ knowledge on school violence mechanisms. This way, it creates the environment of support at school that reduces peer violence.
Tue, 21 September
  • 10:00 - 11:00

    Opening session

    Young cybercriminals – what should children and youth know not to become one? Adam Lange
    Young people are increasingly often responsible for crimes in cyberspace, often without realising that they are committing a crime which may have an impact on their future life. During my lecture I will present examples of crimes committed by minors on the internet and I will try to describe how early education may protect them from problems.
    Hate Speech, disinformation and conspiracy myths as challenges to civil societies Alia Pagin
    Academic disciplines have been investigating and are challenged by the immense variables of „fake news“ and hate speeches and their malignant outcomes. It is evident that it is a worldwide phenomenon and is not restricted to some particular countries. It is therefore highly important to raise a general awareness and enable people to identify disinformation, populist discourses and conspiracy narratives, regardless of any exclusive cultural context. In order to prevent people from falling into disinformation or ideological abuse, primary technological knowledge and media education, combined with a critical understanding about our individual use of (digital) media, is an indispensable factor.
  • 11:00 - 11:15

    Break

  • 11:15 - 12:15

    Problems with body image online among youth

    Inspiring young people to think critically about pornography and healthy relationships online Kate Jones
    Considering the impact pornography has on young people’s relationships, body image and expectations of others. Including: - Exploring the unwritten rules young people are experiencing online within their relationships and friendships. - Understanding how we support young people in developing strategies for the online world, including resisting the pressure to engage with pornography, navigating consent within relationships online and the pressure to share personal images. - Highlighting key resources from the UK to support with these issues.
    Impact of social media on self-perception of the body by youth Ewa Dziemidowicz
    Social media constitute the everyday environment that young people function in. While using Instagram, TikTok and other online platforms, they watch popular trends created and copied by well-known people and by their fellow peers. Online models have an impact on their shared values, attitudes and behaviours, also those related to their bodies and self image online. The way they present themselves and the way they are perceived on the internet can have a major impact on their mood and mental well-being. During her presentation Ewa Dziemidowicz will quote selected results of the latest Empowering Children Foundation research on self-perception of the body by teenagers who are active online, she will discuss it in the context of preventive measures planned by Empowering Children Foundation, aimed at promoting critical approach to internet models and fostering the idea of positive body image among youth.
    Are nude photos necessary? Martyna Różycka
    Self-presentation by teenagers includes taking erotic and pornographic pictures of themselves. The fact that teenagers take the pictures themselves does not always mean that they do that voluntarily. Let’s look closer at what is happening when an erotic photo or streaming of erotic content falls into some stranger’s hands and is published on the internet.
  • 12:15 - 12:30

    Break

  • 12:30 - 13:30

    Digital children rights

    Child’s perspective – an important voice for the future of the internet Anna Rywczyńska
    Times when only adults have had decisive voice about the internet need to become a thing of the past. Opinions of children and youth need to be heard as they are key recipients of internet content and services (according to UNICEF report 1 in 3 internet users are children). As emphasised by the Council of Europe in the definition of the rights of the child in the digital environment, schools, governments and international bodies should ask children about their views on internet solutions that concern them and take these views seriously. There is another important obligation left – making children realise what rights they have and how they can safeguard them and what they can expect from the adults’ world – both in the context of family as well as from public administration and business world.
    Violence against Women and Girls - the online gender gap David Wright
    Where ever you look, women and girls are disproportionately victims of online violence or abuse online. Why is this? As a particular form of abuse, Image Based abuse often has a shattering and life threatening impact on victims, particularly on women and girls. This shows no sign of abating as the UK Revenge Porn Helpline reported a doubling of cases reported in 2020 compared to 2019 with evidence of cases being aggravated by lock down restrictions. The presentation will share the experiences of the UK Revenge Porn Helpline since its launch in 2015, sharing the striking gender disparity in intimate image abuse. How can we better support and prevent this online abuse? Are we minding the gender gap or are we mending the gender gap? No one should suffer from online abuse and victimisation
    What kind of support do teachers need in order to educate their students according to values and to respect their rights? Bartłomiej Kuczyński
  • 13:30 - 14:30

    Lunch break

  • 14:30 - 15:15

    Discussion on the film - Jawline (2019)

    Moderators Anna Rywczyńska, Szymon Wójcik, Panelists: Dr Karol Jachymek, Marta Wojtas
  • 15:15 - 15:30

    Closing of the conference

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